• Nano-vaccines

    Project keywords

    Nanomaterials, Nanotechnology, Antigen delivery, Vaccine adjuvants, Immune responses

    Project summary

    Vaccination is essential for effective control of infectious diseases. Subunit vaccines consist of isolated recombinant antigens and adjuvants that boost antigen immunity, having an improved safety profile over traditional vaccines. This project aims to develop effective immune adjuvants with low toxicity that promote both cellular (Th1) and humoral (Th2) immune responses of antigens and to generate robust long term immunity. Nanomaterials are engineered with desired structures to act as adjuvants and delivery vehicles for antigens with the following functions, 1) prompting the "depot" effect and increasing the availability of antigens to antigen presenting cells (APCs); 2) generating danger signals (e.g. reactive oxygen species, ROS) or co-delivering other immunostimulatory compounds (e.g. glucans) to activate NLRP3 inflammasome and trigger the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines (Mechanism 1 in Scheme); and 3) enhancing cellular uptake by APCs via endocytosis pathway to promote strong Th1 immune response (Mechanism 2). Nano-vaccines are expected to improve healthcare quality for both human beings and livestock.

    Project contacts

    Lead investigator Professor Chengzhong Yu
    Research group Yu Group
    Contact email c.yu@uq.edu.au
    Vaccination is essential for effective control of infectious diseases. Subunit vaccines consist of isolated recombinant antigens and adjuvants that boost antigen immunity, having an improved safety profile over traditional vaccines
  • Nanomaterials for Energy Storage

    Project keywords

    Nanomaterials, Energy, Manufacturing, Sustainability, Electrochemistry, Energy Storage

    Project summary

    Electrochemical energy storage and conversion systems, which primarily include rechargeable batteries and supercapacitors, are among the leading technologies that have been projected to provide the solution to the complex energy storage gridlock. This project aims to develop advanced electrochemical energy storage systems with high energy density, high power density, and long serving life for diverse applications. We are designing new protocols to prepare nanostructured materials (patented), including carbon, metal oxides and their composites, for a broad spectrum of energy storage applications.

    Project contacts

    Lead investigator Professor Chengzhong Yu
    Dr Xiaodan Huang
    Research group Yu Group
    Contact email c.yu@uq.edu.au
    x.huang@uq.edu.au
    Electrochemical energy storage and conversion systems, which primarily include rechargeable batteries and supercapacitors, are among the leading technologies that have been projected to provide the solution to the complex energy storage gridloc
  • Nanomaterials for Water Treatment

    Project keywords

    Nanomaterials, Health, Manufacturing, Sustainability, Water Treatment, Nanoparticles, Absorbents

    Project summary

    Australia is the driest inhabited continent on earth and is regularly subject to the prolonged rainfall deficiency, increased surface water salinity and water bodies contamination. Decontamination, desalination and separation technologies have captured great interest as the alternative ways to augment the available water resources. We are developing new strategies to prepare low cost and high performance nanomaterials / nanodevices for water pollutants (heavy metal ions and organic toxins) removal and saline water desalination.

    Project contacts

    Lead investigator Professor Chengzhong Yu
    Dr Xiaodan Huang
    Research group Yu Group
    Contact email c.yu@uq.edu.au
    x.huang@uq.edu.au
    Australia is the driest inhabited continent on earth and is regularly subject to the prolonged rainfall deficiency, increased surface water salinity and water bodies contamination.
  • Nanotechnology for High-performance Fertilizers

    Project keywords

    Nanotechnology, Fertilizer, Cation Exchange, Globe Warming

    Project summary

    Natural nitrogen circulation in soil decreases the efficiency of fertilisers due to the leaching, run-off and emission of nitrogen. Frequent fertilizer application leads to enormous economic costs and arises concerns on nutrient pollutions. The emission of green house gas NOx and nitrogen discharge into water body have severely influenced local environment and global climate. This project aims to develop novel fertilizer amendments for agricultural applications through 1) engineering a new-generation nanoclay materials with high exchange capacity as nutrient sorbers to prevent nitrogen loss; 2) developing efficient fertilizer formulations by achieving the sustained release of nutrient from the absorber; 3) minimizing the emission of nitrogen into atmosphere and water body to address the pollution problems.

    Project contacts

    Lead investigator Professor Chengzhong Yu
    Dr Jun Zhang
    Research group Yu Group
    Contact email

    c.yu@uq.edu.au
    j.zhang11@uq.edu.au

    Natural nitrogen circulation in soil decreases the efficiency of fertilisers due to the leaching, run-off and emission of nitrogen. Frequent fertilizer application leads to enormous economic costs and arises concerns on nutrient pollutions.
  • Nanotechnology for Livestock Healthcare

    Project keywords

    Nanotechnology, Livestock, Pesticides, Animal feed, Animal healthcare

    Project summary

    Livestock production and other sectors of the livestock supply chain contribute significantly to regional communities and the overall Australia economy. This project aims to use state-of-the-art nanotechnology to improve livestock healthcare through the following aspects: 1) developing a safe and efficient alternative (antibacterial nano-formulation) to antibiotic supplements in animal nutrition products; 2) generating novel nano-pesticides with improved safety and performance for livestock pest control; 3) engineering nano-digestive enzymes to address small animal digestive problems.

    Project contacts

    Lead investigator

    Professor Chengzhong Yu
    Dr Meihua Yu

    Research group Yu Group
    Contact email

    c.yu@uq.edu.au
    m.yu2@uq.edu.au

    This project aims to use state-of-the-art nanotechnology to improve
  • Sensitive Detection of Biomolecules

    Project keywords

    Nanomaterials, Nanobiotechnology, Health, Mass spectrometry, Enrichment, Biomarkers, Detection, Biomolecules

    Project summary

    Biomolecules with clinical significance are most often various forms of proteins or peptides at very low concentrations in biological systems. Quantitative analysis of them is a big challenge due to the complexity of bio-samples, but essential for diagnosis and clinical applications. In this project, we focus on developing novel approaches for the sensitive detection of trace amount biomolecules using state-of-the-art nanotechnology.

    Project contacts

    Lead investigator Professor Chengzhong Yu
    Research group Yu Group
    Contact email c.yu@uq.edu.au
    Nanomaterials, Nanobiotechnology, Health, Mass spectrometry, Enrichment, Biomarkers, Detection, Biomolecules
  • Silica Nanoparticles for Drug Delivery

    Project keywords

    Silica, Nanoparticles, Delivery vectors, Cancer treatment, Gene therapy

    Project summary

    Nanomaterials applied in nanomedicine have drawn remarkable research interest owning to their great potential in improving efficiency of therapeutic intervention. This project aims to develop advanced functional silica nanoparticles as delivery vehicles for drug delivery applications, including cancer treatment, immunotherapy and cancer therapy. Our strategy has the potential to address the issues of cell membrane permeability of naked biomolecules, low solubility of hydrophobic agents and unwanted toxicity of anticancer drugs. Engineered silica nanoparticles hold great promise in enhancing the intracellular delivery efficacy of therapeutic agents, such as plasmid DNA, siRNA, large protein molecules, hydrophilic/hydrophobic small anticancer drugs and photosensitizes.

    Project contacts

    Lead investigator Professor Chengzhong Yu
    Research group Yu Group
    Contact email c.yu@uq.edu.au
    Nanomaterials applied in nanomedicine have drawn remarkable research interest owning to their great potential in improving efficiency of therapeutic intervention.
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